Switching broadband provider

Man on laptop

It’s never been easier to switch your broadband to a better deal. Read our guide to find out everything you need to know.

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Should I switch my broadband provider?

Fast internet and a good connection is almost essential in today’s world and with both constantly improving, you may want to switch broadband provider to ensure you’re getting a good deal for a good price.

Many providers will give you great rates for an introductory period of a year or two, but once that’s over you could be paying way over the odds for broadband. By switching providers, you could save money and get a better connection too.

Use our broadband speed test to find out if you get the speed you’re paying for, and compare broadband deals if you think you could be doing better.

Can I switch broadband during contract?

Yes, but if your existing contract has a minimum term and you’re still within that period, it’s likely you will have to pay an early exit charge fee. If you still want to cancel during the contract, make sure any potential cancellation fee is less than the amount you could save by switching.

Ofcom rules that this early exit fee may not apply if you’re leaving your current contract because you’re not getting the speed you were promised, however. You will have to contact your provider and check their minimum guarantee terms and conditions though.

How much does switching cost?

The cost of your tariff is just one part of your broadband package, so as well as early exit fees, connection charges and line rental, you should also consider:

  • Set-up fees
  • New router charge
  • Technical support costs
  • Upfront fees for things like set-top boxes or Wi-Fi boosters if required

Each provider will have their own fees and charges, so check before you commit to a new package.

How do I cancel my old broadband and how do I switch?

If you decide to switch broadband companies, your new provider should arrange the whole transfer for you. This includes letting your existing provider know that you’re moving. You will be kept in the loop via emails or letters from both new and old broadband providers confirming the switch.

These will include details of the transfer date and if there are any outstanding charges to pay.

What if your new broadband provider can’t arrange the switch?

It’s easy to arrange the switch yourself if you need to. You’ll need to do the following:

  1. Call your new broadband provider and ask them when they can transfer you over to the new contract
  2. Book the date for the transfer
  3. Contact your old provider to confirm that you want to cancel on the day your new service starts

Will I lose internet during the switch?

In most cases, you will be able to switch with little or no service interruption. Your new provider should let you know when the switch is going to happen and if you’re likely to experience any loss of service.

Can I keep my landline phone number if I change broadband providers?

Yes, your current home broadband provider should let you to keep your landline number when you move to a new provider, as per Ofcom regulations. Your new provider doesn’t have to accept your request to transfer over your number, so make sure you ask before committing to switching.

How long does it take to switch broadband?

This is dependent on the provider and how simple your switch is but typically, it takes about two weeks. If you need any installation or engineering work done, it might take a little longer – but your internet should still work during this time. You can talk to your new provider to find out how long your switch should take.

Where can I get the best deal on broadband?

The best broadband package is what works best for you, so think about your usage habits and budget when assessing what’s on offer.

You can compare broadband deals with MoneySuperMarket. All you need to do is input your postcode and we’ll show you all the deals available in your area. You can filter by speed or contract length, as well as viewing deals that include a TV package or landline phone calls.