HOME INSURANCE

Do you live in a burglary
hotspot?

People living in some parts of the UK are significantly more likely to become victims of burglary than others, our research reveals.

Over the last year we’ve helped around 820,000 people compare home insurance quotes. When each of those people used our home insurance comparison service, they told us about any burglary claims they’ve made in the last two years.

With that kind of information, we’re able to map out the UK’s burglary hotspots – highlighting the postcode areas of the country where households are most and least likely to have to make a claim because they’ve been burgled.

This year the SE21 postcode area of South Tulse Hill & Dulwich in South London has taken the dubious crown of being the postcode area where you’re most likely to have to make a claim. At the other end of the scale, the SA9 postcode area of Harbury, near Leamington Spa, is where people are least likely to make a burglary claim.

Of course wherever you live, a careful approach to home security and some common sense can go a long way to ensuring you don’t have to become a burglary claim statistic. Click here to read more.

Highest amount of offences map

Map of the UK showing burglary hotspots

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What types of home insurance are there?

What types of home insurance are there? 

There are two types of home insurance:

Contents insurance

This covers the cost of replacing all your possessions, such as furniture, electrical items, clothing, jewellery and other belongings. You might find it helpful to work out the value of the contents of each room in turn before adding them together for your grand total. When you run a quotation, we’ll ask you about any particularly valuable items (those worth more than £1,000), along with any laptops and bicycles.

Buildings insurance

This covers your bricks and mortar, and would pay for repairs or rebuilding costs if, for example, your property were damaged or destroyed by a fire or storm. The amount of buildings cover you need is based on how much it would cost to rebuild your property, rather than its market value. When you run a quote, we’ll suggest a re-build amount using data about your address provided by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.


What information do I need to run a building and contents insurance quote?

There are a few details you’ll need to provide to get your quote…

  • Your address, the type of property and roughly when it was built
  • How many rooms the property has
  • Whether there are trees taller than 10 metres within 5 metres of the property
  • What percentage of your roof is flat, if any
  • When you bought the property
  • Who lives there, and when are people typically at home
  • What sort of locks are on the doors and windows
  • How much would it cost to rebuild (we’ll suggest a figure based on your postcode)
  • How much it would cost to replace your contents

What kind of insurance should I get?

If you own your home, then you will need both buildings and contents insurance. If you have a mortgage, your bank or building society will require you to have buildings insurance.

If you’re a renting your property, then buildings cover will be the responsibility of your landlord, but you will need contents cover to protect your possessions.


How can I save on my home insurance?

Don’t be tempted to scrimp on cover to reduce your premiums. There are other ways you can keep costs down which won’t leave you financially exposed.

When buying cover, remember that taking out combined building and contents cover with the same insurer can be cheaper than buying separate policies.

You could consider increasing your voluntary excess to reduce your premium. This is the part of any insurance claim you have to pay yourself.

Try to pay for your cover in a lump sum up-front if you can. If you pay in monthly instalments instead, you’ll usually have to pay interest on these payments.  

And remember that if you can avoid making a claim, you’ll get lower premiums by building up a no claims bonus.