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Landlord - Condensation problem

Last post Thu, Nov 20 2008, 10:59 PM by sarah1981. 5 replies.
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  •  Thu, Nov 20 2008, 10:59 PM

    Re: Landlord - Condensation problem

    Thank you for all your replies. I have spoken to the managing agency and told them I am not legally obliged to have the ventilation system installed as when I was under the impression it was damp I tried to rectify it but this is not a damp but a condensation problem which is not covered by the Landlord and Tenant Act (I think I am right :-/ ) and the tenant should be responsible enough to ventilate the room etc but apparently I was told that she has begun opening her windows and putting the heating on etc but its not working. So I dont know what the outcome will be when they speak to the tenant, no doubt another threat of witholding rent.

    Thank you all.

    • Post Points: 5
  •  Thu, Nov 20 2008, 7:37 PM

    Re: Landlord - Condensation problem

    You know why it's a problem with ground floor flats don't you? The tenant is reluctant to leave the window open in case he gets burgled.

    (I used to live in a ground floor flat, and had the same problem.) Also I have noticed that since there was the requirement that extractor fans have a switch, the tenants switch them off, so they don't make a noise at night.

    Solutions: Perhaps disconnect the switch, and/or install a fixed ventilator in the wall/window.

    • Post Points: 20
  •  Thu, Nov 20 2008, 5:56 PM

    Re: Landlord - Condensation problem

    Hi, I too am a landlord and we have, over the last ten years constantly had a problem with damp in the bedroom of a downstairs flat that we rent out. We have had two damp proof courses and several damp reports that say the problem simply is condensation. This is probably the case as when the flat is empty there is no damp. We have tried ventilating the property more, putting an extractor fan in the bathroom which operates when the light is switched on, all to no avail. We have lost count of the amount of tenants that we have lost through this, and the amount of times that we have had to arrange for redecoration to be carried out. Dehumidifiers do help. Our letting agency says that this is a common problem with ground floor flats. If anyone out there has the magic answer to the problem, please let me into the secret.
    • Post Points: 20
  •  Thu, Nov 20 2008, 4:57 PM

    Re: Landlord - Condensation problem

    Sack the agent, and tell the tenant if he doesn't like the flat, you will release him from his contract.
    • Post Points: 5
  •  Thu, Nov 20 2008, 4:37 PM

    Re: Landlord - Condensation problem

    The tumble dryer may be a condensing one which does not need venting to the outside. That said, if the report says the problem is condensation not damp, then the tenant has an obligation to look after the property and keep it ventilated. I have had similar problems in one of my houses. I cleaned the walls with bleach to stop the mould growing and told the tenant to keep a flow of air in the property. Do you have a copy of the damp report? If not I suggest you get a copy from the agent in case this goes any further.

    I do not have agents managing my properties as I have found them to be useless and expensive.

    • Post Points: 20
  •  Thu, Nov 20 2008, 4:25 PM

    Landlord - Condensation problem

    Hi

    Im a landlord and roughly a year ago the letting agency told me that the tenant in the downstairs front bedroom reported damp so I instructed the letting agency to "sort it out" at my expense off course as I understand it is a problem I am obliged to deal with as a landlord. It transpired the letting agency simply sent a handyman around who cleaned the damp and painted the wall beneath the window and charged me £45. A few months later the tenant complained again and I told the letting agency to deal with it using their contractor but this time to deal with the problem - the damp. However they did the same thing again, so I contacted a contractor myself and had a part damp proof course in that wall of the room carried out which cost roughly £300. The tenancy came to an end and a new tenant moved in and I thought the problem had been resolved but the new tenant complained of damp too and I didnt know what else to do so I bought the tenant a dehumidifier. However, the tenant complained again recently and said if the problem is not resolved she will withold rent and I told the letting agency to send someone around to resolve the problem because I simply dont know what else to do.

    This time they had a damp report carried out and the contractors report said that there is no evidence of rising or penetrating damp in the property. The problem is condensattion which is evident throughout the property. Isn't this due to a lack of ventilation? As I used to live in that property and it was perfectly alright but now the bathroom walls have mould growing on them, so isn't this down to the tenants not ventilating the property properly,Plus they have bought themselves a tumble drier which is not vented to the outside.

    The contractor recommended installing a drimaster ventilation system in the loft for these condensation/mould problems. I have always tried to be reasonable with the tenants and always tried to resolve any problems as quickly as possible and always at my expense off course, however this system will cost around £700 and I simply can't afford it and I was wondering if I am obliged to have it installed if it is a condensation problem not a damp problem. The letting agency have told me if I don't contact them in 4 days they will go ahead with it anyway.

    Thank you

    • Post Points: 35